Dec 13, 2017

VENITISM - Venitism is a free-content business blog | OCT 31, 2017 | UN CLIMATE HOAX JUNKET | Excerpts: .. The current state of debate about climate change is spitting science in the face and treating science like a piece of rubbish. Carbon dioxide is treated like a toxic gas by proponents of radical policies on climate change. Next it will be oxygen, it will be anything that you want on the chemical table. The Sun is a primary driver of climate change — and has a far greater impact than changes in CO2. Climate science is dangerously corrupted and co-opted by multiple anti-science forces and players. Much of the reporting about climate change in the mainstream media is fake news. There are many fads and fashions that have sprung up around climate change. For example, the locavore movement, which stresses eating locally-produced food to save energy, actually increases greenhouse gases, because of the energy efficiencies achieved by larger and more established farms that benefit from economies of scale. Governor Jerry Brown had warned of a drought of immeasurable magnitude — a meaningless phrase, in scientific terms. The movement toward renewable energy sources, he said, was not a sign of progress, but regression toward the lower energy densities of the pre-industrial age. Belief in carbon pollution is like the superstitious beliefs of primitive civilizations, such as a 1933 newspaper article describing a drought in Syria that was blamed by locals on yo-yo toys! .. |



The 23rd UN climate hoax junket takes place in Bonn, Germany, on 6-17 November. What is the focus of COP23 after the Paris agreement? What are the challenges?

The COP conferences are a series of summits where countries discuss how to tackle climate change and stands for Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. The next one in Bonn will be the 23rd one, dedicated to discussing how to follow up on the Paris agreement, which was the result of a previous COP summit.

We observe the irrationality of the doctrine of global warming, the naive belief that small variations of global temperature we experience have an anthropogenic origin!

Parliament will attend with a delegation of 12 MEPs led by environment committee chair Adina Vālean, a Romanian member of the EPP group.

What is the Paris agreement?

The Paris agreement is the world’s first universal, legally binding climate deal adopted by 195 countries in December 2015 at the COP21 summit in Paris. It sets out a global plan on how to limit the increase in global temperatures to well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels. The deal entered into force on 4 November 2016 after the European Parliament gave its consent to the EU’s ratification.

What are the goals of COP23?

Governments are meeting at COP23 to advance the implementation of the Paris agreement. The focus is on the development of guidelines on how the Paris agreement’s provisions will be implemented across a wide range of issues including transparency, adaptation, emission reductions, provision of finance, capacity-building and technology. The aim is make progress in all these areas so that the guidelines can be completed by the time the next COP summit takes place in Poland next year.

What will be some of the challenges at COP23?

One of the tasks of COP23 is to prepare next year’s talks on countries will need to increase their contributions in order to meet the targets of the Paris agreement. In addition the US withdrawing from the agreement will make it more difficult to achieve the targets set out in it.

European Parliament delegation in Bonn

The Parliament delegation to COP23 will be briefed on a daily basis by Miguel Arias Cañete, the commissioner responsible for climate action and energy. At the summit MEPs will also take part in background talks with representatives from the UN, delegations from different countries and international organisations and civil society organisations.

German EPP member Peter Liese, who will be part of the Parliament delegation, said about COP23: “Big decisions won’t be made, but it’s extremely important that after the United States announced they will opt out of the Paris agreement, the rest of the world stays united.”

He added: “It is important not to take a step back, and maybe we will even be able to take a step forward with partners like China, Canada, Japan, and get the United States involved again when a new government is in power.”

Regulations run amok in the climate change agenda. The costs of successfully countering the buildup of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the atmosphere are huge—far larger than described in the media and by advocates. It requires the rapid, total phase out of fossil fuels (the leave them in the ground strategy), raising energy prices, and fundamentally changing production and consumption patterns, which would reduce living standards worldwide. The poor will be disproportionately harmed, both within the United States and everywhere.


The costs of reversing GHG emissions could be 1% of global GDP annually—or about $800 billion each year, which is approximately the size of the economy of Holland. Specific industries will be particularly affected—including manufacturing, energy production, mining, transportation, and some types of agriculture. Generally wealthy elites will not bear many of these costs; they will fall squarely on general middle-class citizens. A candid weighing of (very uncertain) benefits and costs and their distribution among populations for compensation is essential for any effective, durable action to address possible climate change.

Any reduction in global GHG emissions and a decline in the stock of GHG already in the atmosphere requires coordinated and major cutbacks in fossil fuels worldwide. Greenhouse gases circulate the globe, meaning that some countries will receive the benefits of costly mitigation taken on by others. Under these circumstances, the incentives to free ride are irresistible. Internal pressures to free ride will be particularly great in those countries that will incur the greatest mitigation costs, that have the weakest government institutions and limited rule of law, and that are big enough to chart their own course regardless of international shaming—Russia, China, India, Brazil, and even the United States. Successful international mitigation will require more than the small “feel good” adjustments currently portrayed by advocates, agency officials, and politicians. But high costs make durable international cooperation unlikely—at least until benefits are much clearer than they are now. Attention to the size of GHG mitigation costs and the corresponding global free-riding problem directs policy toward more fruitful aims.

The current state of debate about climate change is spitting science in the face and treating science like a piece of rubbish. Carbon dioxide is treated like a toxic gas by proponents of radical policies on climate change. Next it will be oxygen, it will be anything that you want on the chemical table. The Sun is a primary driver of climate change — and has a far greater impact than changes in CO2. Climate science is dangerously corrupted and co-opted by multiple anti-science forces and players.

Much of the reporting about climate change in the mainstream media is fake news. There are many fads and fashions that have sprung up around climate change. For example, the locavore movement, which stresses eating locally-produced food to save energy, actually increases greenhouse gases, because of the energy efficiencies achieved by larger and more established farms that benefit from economies of scale. Governor Jerry Brown had warned of a drought of immeasurable magnitude — a meaningless phrase, in scientific terms. The movement toward renewable energy sources, he said, was not a sign of progress, but regression toward the lower energy densities of the pre-industrial age. Belief in carbon pollution is like the superstitious beliefs of primitive civilizations, such as a 1933 newspaper article describing a drought in Syria that was blamed by locals on yo-yo toys!

For all the focus on carbon dioxide, the most important greenhouse gas in the climate system is water vapor. And carbon dioxide is not a pollutant, as the term is conventionally used. While it was true that the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide had been increasing and had passed 400 parts per million, the dominant effect of water vapor had helped flatten the greenhouse effect, such that the rise of global surface temperatures had slowed significantly.

Some climate scientists manipulated graphs to make climate change seem more severe than it was — for example, by representing temperature anomalies rather than absolute temperatures.

There is, in fact, some surface temperature warming, albeit less severe than conventional data sets showed. But the effect is more likely the result of fluctuations in energy output from the sun, which in turn affects water vapor.The major effect of cutting carbon dioxide emissions to zero would be to kill and hurt poor people and greatly harm animals and the environment.

Symbiotic plant-fungi relationships allow both to thrive against the odds. In very hot climates, each plant cell is dominated by a particular strain of fungus. The fungus is helping its host offset the presence of particular stressors, which include salinity, heat, aridity, or cold. These plants are no more adapted to those stressors than your average garden plant, but they have adapted by forming symbiotic associations with the microscopic fungi that live inside them.

Certain fungi seem to prevent stressed plants from going into panic mode. When a plant receives less water or more heat than it typically requires, its metabolism goes haywire and it expends increased amounts of energy to survive. Most plants under stress also produce more oxidative chemicals, which are lethal to them in high doses. Certain fungi help plants handle stressors with greater equanimity — with them, their metabolism, although it slows down, does so in a more coordinated way, and their production of oxidative chemicals doesn’t spike. The result is steadier growth despite extreme conditions.

It’s feared that climate change will have cascading effects on farmers’ lives — with greater amounts of money being put into producing smaller yields and smaller profits. Symbiotic products have cascading effects in a positive direction: farmers should have more crops to sell, so there will be less seed to buy and more money to spend on other things. There are truly profound accomplishments that we can achieve through cooperation.