April 17, 2015

Everyone thought Europe's most powerful man was completely wrong — but he pulled us back from the brink of disaster and is now completely vindicated - April 17, 2015


Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images

Mario Draghi is back.

Just a few short months ago, the consensus seemed to be Europe was about to fall into a Japan-style lost decade of inflation, but with higher unemployment and the extra nationalist tension.

Nobody was sure that the European Central Bank (ECB) chief could do anything about it — he was facing crippling opposition within his own board, and from some of the governments in the eurozone.

I admit that I fell into that camp of people — I thought more QE was a good idea but I didn't think Draghi either had the desire or the support to really do "what it takes."

At the time, all analysts seemed to talk about was the fact that the ECB couldn't do very much (if it was done at all) — it would not be "a panacea", "a silver bullet" or "a magic wand." Of course, nobody had suggested it would be.

And as recently as December, some people even suggested Draghi was about to flee the horrors of the European Central Bank (ECB) and become President of Italy.

But Draghi has a lot of reasons to be cheerful now. Even the protester who burst into the ECB and showered him in confetti shouldn't dampen his spirits.

For starters, he won the internal battle over the ECB's QE programme. It was about twice as large as analysts generally expected. And opposition to the scheme has evaporated, and even German finance minister Wolfgang Schaeuble seems to have begrudgingly conceded that the programme seems to be going well.

Pretty much every indicator is looking up at the moment: Consumption is particularly explosive at the moment, with car sales up by 13% in the last year, led by a 40% boom in Spain.

It's hard to disentangle the onset of QE from the plunge in oil prices, but inflation expectations have now stopped tumbling.



Oxord Economics

[Short Video Update] Fukushima/Cern Update./West Coast Fisheries Closed


Published on Apr 17, 2015
Cern running at high beam intensity, particle collisions could be close.
http://www.bpearthwatch.com
http://home.web.cern.ch/

Resist, Resent, Revenge – Part 1/2

April 17, 2015 By Steve Beckow


As a student of awareness, I know that my proper subject of study is me and, as a journalist, my proper partner for sharing is you.

So let me look at a pattern in my own behavior that I’m investigating in order to let go of.

Everything hid shall be made plain. Why would I want to hide anything that’s only going to come out later? Fear of ridicule, yes. But being free of this stuff is so much more rewarding than fearing ridicule.

I also want to say, if I can talk about these topics, hey, so can others. There’s no need to keep polishing our image when it never worked in the past and won’t work in the future.

The response pattern is called “resist, resent, revenge.” (1) It’s a subtle and yet pervasive behavior pattern in our society.

I see it as one strategy in an agenda of desire and control. The person who employs it usually wants what he (or she) wants when he wants it. And he uses control to get it.

I wager that most 3D people have tried to use control in some situations, no matter how subtly. Many people were just better at it than others and never got called on it.

The one who controls expects others to bend to the service of his (or her) desires. This pattern is usually associated with an exaggerated sense of self-importance and self-servingness in most explanations.

Exogen Update - April 17, 2015 CET

USA REQUESTED EXTENSION UNTIL APRIL 30TH TO START TRANSACTIONS FOR
SECURITY REASONS

HIGHLY LIKELY OTHER COALITION COUNTRIES WILL START TRANSACTIONS PRIOR TO USA

CHINA NOT IN AGREEMENT

UPDATE ON OUTCOME OF DISCUSSIONS & MEETINGS LATER TODAY


Visit stage3alpha at: http://s3alpha.net/?xg_source=msg_mes_network